BLM Support Continues to Drop… I Wonder Why

As you well know, Black Lives Matter, better known as BLM, has been in many conversations over the last year or so. And according to the political left and their propaganda wing, aka mainstream media, they are doing America a great service by making us aware of the racism that clearly still exists in our nation and fighting for ways to end it.

However, is that what the rest of America thinks about the group?

Well, according to a national polling outlet, Civiqs, not precisely.

The survey to gauge support for BLM first began in April of 2017 and asked registered voters. It found that BLM’s increases and decreases in support have nothing short of a roller coaster in the last year, with support dropping significantly as time continues.

It notes that on January 1, 2018, support for the group was at about 38 percent of all registered voters asked. Forty-one percent were opposed, 18 percent neither supported nor opposed it, and 3 percent were unsure.

Fast forward to today, and it would appear that support for the group overall has risen, thanks to a May 21 rendering of the survey. Now, 47 percent support BLM, 40 percent are opposed to it, 12 percent neither support nor oppose it, and only 1 percent don’t know.

However, this fails to tell you how support rose even higher than this for a time and has now decreased and is continuing to do so.

You see, in 2020, as I’m sure you can imagine, the graph of support looked much different.

As the New York Times represents the data on what appears to be a typical bell curve graph, support for BLM began to rise on March 13, 2020, which is the day that Breonna Taylor was during a police raid in Louisville, Kentucky. Two months later, that support rose even more due to the death of George Floyd on May 25. And it continued to grow, reaching a whopping 53 percent on June 3.

At that time, those opposed to BLM dropped to 29 percent, those who were neutral stood at 17 percent, and 2 percent of Americans were unsure.

However, you will note that this is about when the many riots and “peaceful protests” began to break out all across the country. As the Times reports, “protests have spread to more than 140 cities nationwide.”

Thanks to those riots, support for the group has once again dropped. And it looks like that support will continue to decrease as protests and riots continue throughout the nation.

Now, of course, that’s not precisely the reasoning the political left wants to agree to. Instead, according to two academics, both of whom have studied things like “white racial guilt” and race and identity, BLM is losing popularity because of white Americans only.

In Jennifer Chuddy and Hakeem Jefferson’s analysis of the study, “Last summer, as Black Americans turned their sorrow into action, attitudes – especially white attitudes – shifted from tacit support to outright opposition, a pattern familiar in American history. Whereas support for Black Lives Matter remains relatively high among racial and ethnic minorities, support among white Americans has proved both fickle and volatile.”

Fickle and volatile? Really? Is it fickle to decide you are not for the burning down of cities and businesses? Is it volatile to not support looting en masse and violence in the streets?

Furthermore, I very much doubt that all those in opposition to the group are of white descent.

I mean, how do you suppose the black-owned businesses that have been destroyed during riots feel about the group responsible for their livelihood’s demise? How do you think the residents of streets where rioting broke out in Minneapolis and continue to this day feel about the charred remains, the mountains of trash, and the lives ruined after BLM has visited?

I can’t imagine them saying all that many good things…

But don’t just take my word for it.

Instead, look up some of those who live in areas hit by BLM “protests.” Check out the destruction left in their path. Oh, and by the way, nearly every community hit hardest by BLM destruction is a minority one.

That and that alone is the reason for the continued drop in support.